New to Unlimited: Scores of Porn Classics from LBO Entertainment

Browsing the lineup of LBO Entertainment is like slipping into the “18+ only” curtained room at the back of your old hometown video store. The movies have flashy, salacious box art, full of garish designs and on-the-nose titles like Hot ShortsBubble Butts and Breast Wishes. The stars are throwback favorites like Rebecca Bardoux and Vanessa Del Rio. The taglines make an aggressive pitch (“Anything goes and everyone comes”), hoping you’ll select the movie they advertise for your “bottom-of-the-stack” selection this week. Watching an LBO movie is reminiscent of leafing through the pages of an old box of Playboys — you feel like you’re stepping back to an older era of adult entertainment that approaches erotica in a different but equally appealing way. The LBO “back room” can now fit snugly into your back pocket, because the LBO studios catalog is available on Adult Empire Unlimited!

LBO is sometimes credited with spearheading the “reality” genre of porn with the popular series Mr. Peepers. “Based on the concept of the hit show America’s Funniest Home Videos, each video contained three scenes that were supposedly submitted by amateurs who were at home filming their own sex lives on the new toy of the moment of that time, the video camera,” noted AVN in a 2013 retrospective about LBO. “The original boxcovers of the early editions even had the address where people could submit their tapes for review, and quite a few submissions were included in some of the volumes.”

LBO was created by the late porn giant Bob Genova, who was also the force behind several other popular porn brands. Additionally, he gave many pornstars and directors their first big breaks. Rodney Moore, now well known for his own line of movies, got his start with LBO, as did Sean Michaels and Bobby Hollander.

Over 400 LBO movies are available as part of Unlimited — browse them here! (New to Unlimited? Learn more!)

The Nympho Files is quintessential ’90s porn, from the crazy pornstar name (Kimberly Kupps) to the loud color scheme right down to the prominent mention of digital sound and DVD-ROM compatibility.